Feb 102013
 

via nextnature.net

Once there were wristwatch tanlines, now there are iPhone pocket lines…

This example of generational visual rhetoric could be useful for discussions of Hochschild, etc. in WR101. To me, it raises questions about the difference between rapidly changing fashions versus once-faddish behaviors with longer impact on identity and behavior. (But maybe that’s just me?)

Nov 072012
 

My WR101 sections have been considering the complications and possibilities of visual rhetoric in preparation for their Unit 3 essay, so I thought I’d share a pair of videos I’ve found useful lately. I like the juxtaposition of them because — as you’ll see — they rely on the same already familiar mythos of the American automobile (ie, freedom, masculinity, self-determination, etc.) but put that mythos to use in quite different ways. Juxtaposed, they can create a rich space for discussion and writing, and as an in-class exercise today I had students work in groups find a passage from one of our recent readings then use it to craft a robust paragraph in which they worked directly with both textual and visual evidence to make a meaningful comparison of the videos. I often find it challenging to get students working with text AND image rather than one or the other, so hopefully this practice will carry over into their essays, the rough draft of which is due Friday, and in which they will be analyzing the visual and textual presentation of a brand via its website.

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Jul 042012
 

Election years are perhaps my favorites times for teaching, because the useful examples of rhetorics and arguments in “action” come so fast and furious (see what I did there, Mr Holder?). This example of a failed Venn diagram — and the accompanying discussion of the genre — will fit nicely into my WR101 discussion of visual rhetoric and design, which already includes the wonderful blog Indexed, among other examples.

Jan 242012
 

The new street signs using the Clearview font are an improvement, but this sign is incorrect. The capital A is out of proportion to the lower case letters, and it is visually jarring. The signs with all capital letters, such as at the corner of Tremont and Hanson Streets, are correctly printed and look much better. The city should continue to correct this. It is a small detail that impacts the visual quality of the South End. Thank you. @ Citizens Connect

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